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North-South benefit sharing arrangements in bioprospecting and genetic research: a critical ethical and legal analysis.
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North-South benefit sharing arrangements in bioprospecting and genetic research: a critical ethical and legal analysis.

Author: U Schüklenk Affiliation: Centre for Ethics in Public Policy and Corporate Governance, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK.; A Kleinsmidt
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Developing world bioethics, 2006 Dec; 6(3): 122-34
  Peer-reviewed
Other Databases: Academic Search CompleteWorldCat
Summary:
Most pharmaceutical research carried out today is focused on the treatment and management of the lifestyle diseases of the developed world. Diseases that affect mainly poor people are neglected in research advancements in treatment because they cannot generate large financial returns on research and development costs. Benefit sharing arrangements for the use of indigenous resources and genetic research could only  Read more...
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Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: U Schüklenk Affiliation: Centre for Ethics in Public Policy and Corporate Governance, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK.; A Kleinsmidt
ISSN:1471-8731
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 110505688
Notes: 46 refs.
KIE Bib: genetic research
Awards:

Abstract:

Most pharmaceutical research carried out today is focused on the treatment and management of the lifestyle diseases of the developed world. Diseases that affect mainly poor people are neglected in research advancements in treatment because they cannot generate large financial returns on research and development costs. Benefit sharing arrangements for the use of indigenous resources and genetic research could only marginally address this gap in research and development in diseases that affect the poor. Benefit sharing as a strategy is conceptually problematic, even if one, as we do, agrees that impoverished indigenous communities should not be exploited and that they should be assisted in improving their living conditions. The accepted concept of intellectual property protection envisages clearly defined originators and owners of knowledge, whereas the concept of community membership is fluid and indigenous knowledge is, by its very nature, open, with the originator(s) lost in the mists of time. The delineation of 'community' presents serious conceptual and practical difficulties as few communities form discrete, easily discernable groups, and most have problematic leadership structures. Benefit sharing is no substitute for governments' responsibility to uplift impoverished communities. Benefit sharing arrangements may be fraught with difficulties but considerations of respect and equity demand that prior informed consent and consultation around commercialisation of knowledge take place with the source community and their government.
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